Brain Feces

I'm sorry, did I take a dump on your ideology?

Libertarian 'Utopia' Styled After Ayn Rand Book Spectacularly Falls Apart Almost Immediately →

turnabout:

nickjbarlow:

Libertarians and Randroids learning the harsh consequences of their own dogma will always be funny. It does make me wonder if there is a stratum of con artists targeting them, having factored in that people who are distrustful of the state and unlikely to go to the police make brilliant marks.

"It’s almost as if basing a community around people who hate other people and don’t want to have to pay for any services that don’t directly and concretely benefit themselves is inherently unstable. Who would have thought?"

(via russalex)

— 11 hours ago with 482 notes
"…the prison system is fundamentally designed to help us avoid confronting this reality. We much prefer to think of the prison system as protecting us from evil, rather than as protecting us from facing the disavowed evil (racism, economic injustice, lack of education, unemployment, underemployment etc.) that we dance with daily. This same logic can be perceived in the way that religious organizations often view the homeless. Congregants are invited to get involved with homeless ministry to give something back, to offer people a hand up or to bring some good news. What we see then is nothing but an abstraction that makes us feel good, while protecting ourselves from the danger that we might be provoked to fundamentally change how we live by seeing ourselves as part of the reason why there are homeless people in the first place."
— 20 hours ago with 69 notes
memegop:

If the News were “Fair and Balanced”#MemeGOP #UniteBlue
 

memegop:

If the News were “Fair and Balanced”
#MemeGOP #UniteBlue

 

(via turtle-pirate)

— 20 hours ago with 39 notes
jean-luc-gohard:

the-goddamazon:

We know why.


Don’t forget Charlie Sheen. He’s been arrested for domestic violence at least six times and shot a woman. With a gun. And he’s still got a career.

jean-luc-gohard:

the-goddamazon:

We know why.

Don’t forget Charlie Sheen. He’s been arrested for domestic violence at least six times and shot a woman. With a gun. And he’s still got a career.

(Source: jessehimself, via electrophilady)

— 20 hours ago with 11640 notes
Young, Black, and Guilty Until Proven Innocent [TW: Racism, Ethnocentrismm, White Privilege, Criminalization of African-Americans] →

thepoliticalfreakshow:

The New York Times informed us that Michael Brown was “no angel.” When to be young and black is to be guilty until proven innocent, black children must be “angelic” just to be deemed worthy of living.

The Times initially defended its “no angel” assessment of Michael Brown’s young life, which ran on the day of Brown’s funeral. National editor Allison Mitchell said the description connected to the lead paragraph about a moment when Brown thought he saw an angel, and that the article would have been written the same way if it had been about a young white man in the same situation.

ferguson-police-chief.jpgThe Times eventually apologized, but the article is typical of a media pattern of treating white suspects and killers better than black victims. The pattern was so evident in the media narratives around Brown’s death that black Twitter users responded by posting side-by-side pictures of themselves under the hashtag #IfTheyGunnedMeDown, to underscore the power of the images the media uses to portray black victims.

The ritual now follows every police killing — or extra-legal killing — of an unarmed black male. It starts with the formation of a narrative against the victim, as when rumors that Trayvon Martin stole the candy and iced tea found near his body spread across social media. Even video footage of Martin making his final purchase couldn’t quell rumors of his criminality. Martin’s suspension from school, marijuana use, and social media profiles became fodder to “prove” that he must have deserved to die as he did.

In Michael Brown’s case, the ritual began when Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson (above) named Darren Wilson as the officer who shot and killed Michael Brown, while simultaneously releasing video of Brown’s alleged “strong-arm robbery” at a local store moments before his death.

The narrative against Michael Brown was laid bare when the store’s owners disputed Jackson’s claims. Their attorney stated that neither the owners nor any store employee reported a robbery. (A customer inside the store called 911.) The attorney also said that any alleged theft had nothing to do with Wilson shooting and killing Michael Brown. After a barrage of criticism, Chief Jackson admitted that the alleged robbery was “not related to the initial contact” between Brown and Wilson.

Jackson said he released the video because “the press asked for it” and claimed he couldn’t withhold it indefinitely. Police came looking for the store’s surveillance video almost a week after Brown’s death, and withheld at least part of it.

Much later, the unedited surveillance video surfaced, which showed Brown appearing to pay for some items. At the register, Brown seems to realize that he doesn’t have enough money, and appears to put some items back. This prompts the cashier to step from behind the counter, apparently with Brown’s cash in hand, leading to the shoving confrontation in the video clip and still photos that Chief Jackson did release.

michael-brown-convenience-store-getty.jpg

More recent revelations cast doubt on a narrative designed to frame Brown as a violent “thug”:

  • Wilson was said to have a fractured eye socket from the alleged altercation with Brown. A source close to the investigation told CNN that Wilson had a swollen face, but X-rays showed no eye socket fracture. A photograph circulated on social media — and labeled as depicting an injured Wilson — turned out to be a six-year-old photo of someone else.
  • Brown was rumored to have a lengthy criminal record. The St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney’s office said Brown had no criminal record. This week, a St. Louis County judge rejected petitions to release Brown’s alleged criminal records.
  • Newly-released video recorded shortly after the shooting portrays shocked witnesses saying Brown had his hands up, and mimicking Brown’s dying gesture by raising their hands.

The ritual begins robbing black children of their innocence in early childhood. Research shows that people — including police officers — see black children as less innocent and less young than white children. A study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology showed that black boys as young as 10 are more likely than white boys to be mistaken as older, perceived as guilty, and face police violence when accused of a crime.

The school-to-prison pipeline begins in preschool, where black students are disciplined more harshly than their white classmates.

  • Though they make up 18 percent of students, black children account for 35 percent of one-time suspensions, 46 percent of multiple suspensions, and 39 percent of expulsions.
  • One in five black boys, and more than one in ten black girls have received out-of-school suspension.
  • Overall, black students are 3.5 times more likely to be expelled than white students.
  • In districts with “zero tolerance” policies, black and Hispanic students make up 45 percent of students, but 56 percent of expulsions.

Research identifies discrimination as the source of disparity in punishments, and shows that “[e]ven when they commit the exact same offense as white students, black students suffer more severe consequences.”

Michael Brown’s 98-percent-black high school seems to reflect these dismal statistics, with a suspension rate nearly four times the national rate of 11 percent. In 2011, nearly 45 percent of students were suspended. Against these odds, Michael Brown managed to graduate, and would have started college in a few days.

Instead, Michael Brown became just one more young black man killed by police, and posthumously judged guilty until proven “angelic.”

Source: Terrance Heath for The Bilerico Project

— 1 day ago with 21 notes
ultrafacts:




Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

— 1 day ago with 6284 notes
thinksquad:

It’s been almost three years now since Commissioner Charles Ramsey issued a directive to Philly Police, letting them know that it’s entirely legal for the public to record officers doing their work and making arrests — as long as the photographer doesn’t interfere with that police work. It seems his officers still haven’t gotten the message. The ACLU today announced another lawsuit — the fifth in a series — against the department on behalf of a woman who was physically restrained from recording officers arresting a protestor. Here’s the ACLU press release:

The American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania and co-counsel filed a federal lawsuit today on behalf of a Philadelphia woman who was forcefully restrained across the neck by a civil affairs officer to prevent her from recording Philadelphia police officers arresting a protestor on the other side of a glass wall.
This is the fifth in a series of ACLU-PA lawsuits aimed at stopping the Philadelphia Police Department’s illegal practice of retaliating against individuals who observe or record the police performing their duties.
“We have yet to see any indication that the leadership of the Philadelphia Police Department is requiring its officers to respect the First Amendment rights of Philadelphia residents in these situations,” said Reggie Shuford, executive director of the ACLU of Pennsylvania. “Until they get it right, we will continue to hold them accountable to the citizens they have sworn an oath to protect.”
Today’s lawsuit was filed on behalf of Amanda Geraci, a professional psychotherapist and a trained legal observer who was monitoring an anti-fracking protest outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center on September 21, 2012. Legal observers are trained volunteers who monitor the interactions between police and protestors.
After witnessing police take a protestor into custody and handcuff him inside the Convention Center, Geraci remained outside but walked over to a spot on the other side of the glass wall to record the incident. Then, according to the complaint, “Officer Brown approached her at a full run and threw her up against a pillar on the Convention Center’s facade.” Officer Brown then pushed her forearm against Geraci’s neck. Police officers quickly surrounded Brown and Geraci to block the ability of others in the crowd to witness or record the officer’s use of force against Geraci.
“I have been a legal observer for eight years at numerous protests and I have never experienced anything like this,” said Geraci. “I was shocked when Officer Brown pushed me against a column and restrained me by my neck, just for recording the activities of her colleagues as they arrested someone.”
“Once again, what happened to Amanda Geraci shows that the city of Philadelphia is not living up to its promise to protect the First Amendment rights of those who observe and record the police,” said Jonathan H. Feinberg of Kairys, Rudovsky, Messing, & Feinberg and one of the attorneys representing Geraci.
Information about filing a complaint with the ACLU-PA as well as background on the ACLU-PA’s previous lawsuits against the Philadelphia police department challenging the arrest and harassment of individuals for photographing police is available at: www.aclupa.org/copwatch
The ACLU-PA also has a social media campaign running (#PAcopwatch) to encourage people to contact the organization with stories about police harassment for recording.
Geraci is represented by Molly Tack-Hooper and Mary Catherine Roper of the ACLU-PA; John Grogan and Peter Leckman of Langer, Grogan & Diver, P.C.; Feinberg of Kairys, Rudovsky, Messing, & Feinberg; and Seth Kreimer of the University of Pennsylvania Law School.


Read more at http://www.phillymag.com/news/2014/09/15/aclu-sues-police-using-force-stop-photos-arrest/#2mHkthXw2JyPMd2z.99

thinksquad:

It’s been almost three years now since Commissioner Charles Ramsey issued a directive to Philly Police, letting them know that it’s entirely legal for the public to record officers doing their work and making arrests — as long as the photographer doesn’t interfere with that police work. It seems his officers still haven’t gotten the message. The ACLU today announced another lawsuit — the fifth in a series — against the department on behalf of a woman who was physically restrained from recording officers arresting a protestor. Here’s the ACLU press release:
The American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania and co-counsel filed a federal lawsuit today on behalf of a Philadelphia woman who was forcefully restrained across the neck by a civil affairs officer to prevent her from recording Philadelphia police officers arresting a protestor on the other side of a glass wall.

This is the fifth in a series of ACLU-PA lawsuits aimed at stopping the Philadelphia Police Department’s illegal practice of retaliating against individuals who observe or record the police performing their duties.

“We have yet to see any indication that the leadership of the Philadelphia Police Department is requiring its officers to respect the First Amendment rights of Philadelphia residents in these situations,” said Reggie Shuford, executive director of the ACLU of Pennsylvania. “Until they get it right, we will continue to hold them accountable to the citizens they have sworn an oath to protect.”

Today’s lawsuit was filed on behalf of Amanda Geraci, a professional psychotherapist and a trained legal observer who was monitoring an anti-fracking protest outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center on September 21, 2012. Legal observers are trained volunteers who monitor the interactions between police and protestors.

After witnessing police take a protestor into custody and handcuff him inside the Convention Center, Geraci remained outside but walked over to a spot on the other side of the glass wall to record the incident. Then, according to the complaint, “Officer Brown approached her at a full run and threw her up against a pillar on the Convention Center’s facade.” Officer Brown then pushed her forearm against Geraci’s neck. Police officers quickly surrounded Brown and Geraci to block the ability of others in the crowd to witness or record the officer’s use of force against Geraci.

“I have been a legal observer for eight years at numerous protests and I have never experienced anything like this,” said Geraci. “I was shocked when Officer Brown pushed me against a column and restrained me by my neck, just for recording the activities of her colleagues as they arrested someone.”

“Once again, what happened to Amanda Geraci shows that the city of Philadelphia is not living up to its promise to protect the First Amendment rights of those who observe and record the police,” said Jonathan H. Feinberg of Kairys, Rudovsky, Messing, & Feinberg and one of the attorneys representing Geraci.

Information about filing a complaint with the ACLU-PA as well as background on the ACLU-PA’s previous lawsuits against the Philadelphia police department challenging the arrest and harassment of individuals for photographing police is available at: www.aclupa.org/copwatch

The ACLU-PA also has a social media campaign running (#PAcopwatch) to encourage people to contact the organization with stories about police harassment for recording.

Geraci is represented by Molly Tack-Hooper and Mary Catherine Roper of the ACLU-PA; John Grogan and Peter Leckman of Langer, Grogan & Diver, P.C.; Feinberg of Kairys, Rudovsky, Messing, & Feinberg; and Seth Kreimer of the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

Read more at http://www.phillymag.com/news/2014/09/15/aclu-sues-police-using-force-stop-photos-arrest/#2mHkthXw2JyPMd2z.99

(via satanic-capitalist)

— 1 day ago with 124 notes
liberalsarecool:

Institutional racism is any system of inequality based on race.

“the collective failure of an organization to provide an appropriate and professional service to people because of their color, culture, or ethnic origin”.

See: St. Louis County, America, the world.

liberalsarecool:

Institutional racism is any system of inequality based on race.

“the collective failure of an organization to provide an appropriate and professional service to people because of their color, culture, or ethnic origin”.

See: St. Louis County, America, the world.

— 1 day ago with 127 notes